Can Porcelain Veneers Alleviate Tooth Sensitivity?

If you find yourself avoiding your favorite foods or drinks because of temperature concerns, talk to your dentist about porcelain veneers. Porcelain veneers are a durable, long-term option for protecting your natural teeth. They’re not just for movie stars or beauty bloggers anymore – people from all backgrounds are discovering the protective and cosmetic benefits of porcelain veneers.

Since tooth sensitivity can be rooted in a variety of causes, your dentist at Owens Cosmetic and Family Dentistry can determine if porcelain veneers are the best option for your oral health. They’re almost always a worthwhile investment in sensitive front teeth since the cosmetic benefits of veneers are most noticeable there.

Porcelain veneers typically require multiple visits to your dentist, since they require measuring and preparing your teeth for the veneers to be placed. A free consultation is the best way to clear up any questions you have and get an honest assessment of your tooth sensitivity.

Causes of Tooth Sensitivity

The primary cause of tooth sensitivity is enamel erosion or damage. When you drink coffee, soda, or high-sugar fruit juices, your teeth can become worn down over several years. Since your teeth contain sensitive nerve endings, worn-down enamel results in increased sensitivity in these nerves. Your teeth can also become sensitive after damage due to accidents.

It’s crucial to rebuild lost enamel as much as possible to protect your teeth, and porcelain veneers may be a good solution depending on the overall health of your teeth. Porcelain veneers are a permanent solution because your dentist will remove 0.3 – 0.7 mm of enamel from the front surface of your tooth, and this cannot be undone. Although this is not typically uncomfortable, patients with extremely sensitive teeth may want to consider Lumineers instead.

How Other Solutions Fail

Simply avoiding hot or cold foods isn’t enough to deal with the long-term effects of enamel loss. Tooth sensitivity can worsen over time, and passive attempts to manage enamel erosion and other causes of tooth sensitivity can cause additional symptoms and problems to eventually appear. Toothpaste for sensitive teeth can alleviate symptoms, but still can’t halt or reverse the damage being done.

Tooth enamel can be strengthened, but dental intervention is necessary to shield and protect the enamel from the temperature changes that cause sensitivity and pain.

How Porcelain Veneers Help

Porcelain veneers are thin, custom-fitted coverings that act as a shield in place of lost enamel. Your dentist will evaluate and design veneers that fit your teeth and match your natural teeth. While it’s possible to get just one tooth fitted with a porcelain veneer, it’s more common to get a row of six or more placed. This helps the teeth to appear more natural, even as the natural teeth surrounding them continue to age over time.

Long-Term Maintenance

Veneers are wonderful for reducing tooth sensitivity, but they must be maintained to continue providing results. Reducing your intake of acidic foods and drinks is essential to preventing further wear and tear on exposed enamel surfaces. It’s also important to avoid physical damage to the veneers, as they can be damaged by rough contact with metal or glass just like real teeth can.

Overall, though, it’s not hard to protect your investment when you get porcelain veneers. You’ll be able to enjoy your new teeth and eat a wider range of foods soon after the procedure, and will notice an improved smile every time you look in the mirror.

For more information on how porcelain veneers can improve your smile and help to alleviate tooth sensitivity, please contact Owens Cosmetic and Family Dentistry on (248)-671-4545.

Emma Reed has a background in Psychology (B.A.) and Medical Anthropology (M.S.) and writes for a variety of medical publications. Her passion is making cutting-edge medical information accessible to a broader audience, and her work often examines the intersections of sociology, anthropology, and medicine.